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Artist places Harriet Tubman on $20 bills, despite Trump's ambivalence

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CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — There’s a familiar face in town and it’s covering America’s seventh president’s face on a number of $20 bills: Harriet Tubman. New York artist Dano Wall said he has decided to take matters into his own hands with an unofficial revision of the bill since the Trump administration has indicated they are in no rush to put the noted abolitionist and Union spy onto currency. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told a congressional panel this week that the administration is looking at 2028 as a possible date. “We’ll see about that,” Wall tweeted shortly after news broke of the secretary’s decision. We’ll see about that https://t.co/Scg8TZtmih — tubmanstamp (@tubmanstamp) May 22, 2019 Wall’s recrafted bills have sold out. The U.S. Department of Treasury Bureau of Engraving and Printing, states that “any mutilation, cuts, disfigurements or perforation is defamation of currency — a prohibition of law.” Advocates have long sought to have Tubman — a woman born into slavery on a plantation in Dorchester County, Maryland and would later escape to guide over 300 other slaves to

911 calls, body-cam footage released in fatal shooting of Australian woman by police

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iStock/bizoo_n(MINNEAPOLIS) — The 911 calls and some of the body-camera footage, capturing the scene after a Minneapolis police officer shot a woman who had called 911 repeatedly to report a possible sexual assault behind her home, have been released by a judge. On July 15, 2017, Justine Ruszczyk Damond called 911 to report what she feared was a woman being sexually assaulted in the alley behind her home in the city’s Fulton neighborhood, according to a criminal complaint. “I’m not sure if she’s having sex or being raped,” Damond tells the dispatcher in the first 911 call, which was released Thursday. “I think she just yelled out ‘Help,’ but it’s difficult. The sound has been going on for a little while but I think, I don’t think she’s enjoying it. … I don’t know.” The dispatcher tells her that officers are on the way to her home and confirms with Damond that she cannot see anything in the alley behind her home. “It sounds like sex noises but it’s been going on for a while and I think I just

Meet the 22-year-old millennial who beat a politician who had served longer than he'd been alive

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Obtained by ABC News(HARTFORD, Conn.) — Candidates up and down tickets in the 2018 midterm elections were some of the most diverse in U.S. history — they were also the youngest. About 700 millennial candidates ran in roughly 6,000 state legislative races, according to the group Run for Something. Will Haskell was one of those millennials who won. “We need every generation to have a seat at the table,” he told ABC News’ “The Briefing Room.” Haskell, a 22-year-old Democrat, was elected to Connecticut’s state senate in November when he beat incumbent Republican Toni Boucher who had been serving longer than Haskell had been alive. “I’m certainly confused for an intern multiple times a week. But I’ll tell you, it’s already been so rewarding and I’m only a few months into my first term,” Haskell said. Since getting sworn in this January, Haskell has focused on higher education and employment policy. Last month he introduced his first bill, designed to improve mental health prevention and treatment in higher education. Haskell told ABC News, he was “starting with an issue that

Federal court blocks Mississippi's fetal heartbeat law from taking effect

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iStock/visual7(JACKSON, Miss.) — A federal court in Mississippi on Friday temporarily blocked the state’s new “fetal heartbeat” law that bans abortion after roughly six weeks of pregnancy. The law was set to take effect July 1. “Here we go again,” U.S. District Judge Carlton W. Reeves wrote in his opinion. “Mississippi has passed another law banning abortions prior to viability.” Mississippi is one of ten states to push through a law restricting access to abortion in 2019, though all of those laws have faced lawsuits that challenge their constitutionality and none of them are in effect. Georgia, Ohio and Kentucky have passed bans similar to Mississippi’s, and earlier on Friday, Missouri’s governor signed a new eight-week ban. Alabama passed a law that would criminalize abortion for doctors who perform them, while Utah and Arkansas have pushed through legislation that would ban the most common form of second-trimester abortions. The judge went on to say that Mississippi’s law, which was passed in March, “prevents a woman’s free choice, which is central to personal dignity and autonomy.” The case was filed by

Trump defends personal attacks on Pelosi: 'Did you hear what she said about me?'

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump on Friday continued his showdown with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and congressional Democrats regarding oversight of the Mueller investigation and potential impeachment, declaring: “It’s over.” “All they do is want to try and do a redo of the Mueller report,” Trump charged, fielding questions from reporters at the White House as he departed for a trip to Tokyo, Japan. “They were very unhappy with the Mueller report. They want to do a redo of the Mueller report. It’s over. There is no redo. They lost. It’s very clear. There was no collusion. There was no obstruction so there’s no redo.” Pressed by ABC News’ Chief White House Correspondent Jonathan Karl on what he was trying to accomplish with his personal attacks on Pelosi this week, the president shot back, insisting the speaker started it when she accused Trump of leading a cover-up. Pelosi on Thursday also said Trump’s family or members of his administration need to stage “an intervention.” “When you say ‘a personal attack,’ did you hear what she said about me

Trump gives attorney general Barr sweeping power to declassify intelligence in Russia probe review

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Saying he wants him to be “fair,” President Donald Trump on Friday described why he has given Attorney General William Barr sweeping powers to declassify intelligence as part of his review into how the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election began and the resulting surveillance on the Trump campaign. “He’s a great gentleman and a highly respected man,” Trumps told reporters as he left the White on Friday on a trip to Japan. “They will be able to see how this hoax, how the hoax or witch hunt started and why it started. It was an attempted coup or an attempted takedown of the president of the United States. It should never have to happen to anybody else,” he said. “You are going to learn a lot. I hope it will be nice, but perhaps it won’t be,” he said. “I want somebody that will be fair. I think William Barr is one of the most respected men doing what he does in our whole country. I just want him to be fair. I don’t

Grab your chest — 'Alien' turns 40 Saturday

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Photo by Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) — Saturday marks the 40th anniversary of the release of director Ridley Scott’s 1979 sci-fi film classic, Alien. The film, about a blue-collar crew aboard a deep space mining vessel who answer a distress call on a derelict planet and inadvertently bring aboard a killer alien, was a box office smash. It earned $80.9 million domestically — that’s nearly $285 million in 2019 dollars — against a budget of $11 million, and was the fifth-highest-grossing film of the year.  Alien also made an unlikely action star out of 29-year-old actress Sigourney Weaver.  Her portrayal of the steely, resourceful Ellen Ripley proved a woman could be an action hero, and set the stage for subsequent films featuring strong female leads, most recently Wonder Woman and Captain Marvel.  Weaver starred in Alien alongside Tom Skerritt, Harry Dean Stanton, Yaphet Kotto, Veronica Cartwright, Ian Holm and John Hurt — the latter of whom who unwillingly and fatally “birthed” the alien as it burst out of his chest in a shower of blood.  The surprise on

Trump admin bypassing Congress with $7 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates

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iStock/MicroStockHub(WASHINGTON) — The Trump administration on Friday said it would sell $7 billion-worth of weapons to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates with getting congressional approval, citing Iran as an urgent threat.  The move has sparked bipartisan outrage on Capitol Hill, where lawmakers are promising to block the sales and calling out Secretary of State Mike Pompeo for what they see as an illegal decision made in a shady manner. “The excuse that this is somehow an emergency is just flat out false, and they know it. But they’re still going ahead and doing it, which is beyond the pale,” said a congressional aide, speaking anonymously to discuss the details of these deals, which the State Department has not yet released publicly. The State Department authorizes the sale of weapons to foreign countries, but Congress has the authority to block a given sale by vote within 30 days of being notified by the administration. In 2017, the Senate came within four votes of blocking a $510 million sale of munitions to Saudi Arabia, which is fighting alongside UAE and

Rolling Thunder set to take final ride this Memorial Day weekend

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Jeffrey Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images(NEW YORK) — “Ride for Freedom”, comes to a close this Memorial Day weekend, bringing to an end a 31-year tradition of Rolling Thunder veterans riding motorcycles through the streets of Washington D.C., according to the event’s organizers. The spectacle started in 1988 and has gradually accumulated support – netting more than a half a million participants last year – and pays tribute to American veterans. Former Army Sgt. Artie Muller, a 73-year-old Vietnam veteran and co-founder of Rolling Thunder, told the Military Times that costs have become too much to handle at the national level. “It’s just a lot of money,” Muller said in an interview with the publication on the ending of the national ride. Muller said harassment from Pentagon security and local police also played a role in the eradication of the ride. Pentagon spokesperson Sue Gough pushed back on these claims in a statement to ABC News in December. “The department supports the peaceful, lawful exercise of American citizens’ First Amendment rights, and remains focused on ensuring the safety and security of

Manipulated Nancy Pelosi video may be a sign of things to come in the 2020 election cycle

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Mark Makela/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Major digital companies have reacted differently to slow the viral spread of a subtly manipulated video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi – a video that could be a harbinger of the political digital fakery to come in 2020 and beyond. A video that appeared to have been digitally altered to slow the speech of the House Speaker at a recent public appearance, making her appear impaired, made the rounds on social media and major digital platforms in recent days. YouTube said it had removed versions of the slowed-down video, saying it violated company policies. A representative for Facebook said their third-party fact-checking partners had deemed the video “false,” and the social media giant was “heavily reducing its distribution” in Facebook’s newsfeed. Versions of the video still exist on Facebook, however, one of which has been viewed more than 2.5 million times as of this report. A spokesperson for Twitter declined to comment, but at least one version is still live on that platform as of this report. Twitter’s media policy bans videos that show things like

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