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Health

Fiancee sues over NJ principal who died after donating bone marrow

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XiXinXing/iStock(HACKENSACK, N.J.) — The fiancee of a New Jersey principal who died after donating bone marrow to a teenager filed a lawsuit against the hospital on Monday, accusing it of negligence and wrongful death. Westfield High School Principal Derrick Nelson, 44, died at Hackensack University Medical Center in April after donating bone marrow to an anonymous cancer patient in France. Nelson, a father of one, lapsed into a coma during the procedure and died several weeks later. His fiancee, Sheronda Braker, accused the hospital and an anesthesiologist there of negligence in her suit on Monday, claiming they failed to deliver Nelson an adequate supply of oxygen. “At the time of the procedure, Dr. Nelson was known to have sleep apnea and was overweight: two factors which made him a higher risk for undergoing anesthesia,” the lawsuit said. “At the time anesthesia was induced, Dr. Nelson only had an oxygen saturation of 91.” “Despite Dr. Nelson having such a low oxygen saturation, defendants proceeded with the administration of anesthesia and also failed to supply additional oxygen to him,” it added. Braker’s

How does methanol affect the human body?

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Savushkin/iStock(NEW YORK) — Nineteen people in Costa Rica have died after consuming alcohol tainted with harmful levels of methanol. The Costa Rican Ministry of Health has confirmed that out of these fatalities, 14 were men and five were women, all were between the ages of 32 and 72, and occurred across various cities in Costa Rica. The U.S. Department of State confirmed that no U.S. citizen’s illness or death has been related to the consumption of adulterated alcohol in Costa Rica. All victims identified so far have been Costa Rican, and did not consume the alcohol at hotels. The health ministry has confiscated about 30,000 containers of alcohol labeled as Guaro Montano, Guaro Gran Apache, Star Welsh and Aguardiente Molotov, after identifying toxic levels of methanol in them. They have advised the general public to avoid consuming these alcoholic beverages until further investigations are completed and the sources of counterfeit products have been found. Costa Rica President Carlos Alvarado Quesada tweeted out last Friday that he has instructed authorities to continue gathering data in order to identify the sources responsible

New study suggests lowering colorectal cancer screening age by 5 years


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wutwhanfoto/iStock(NEW YORK) — Most people are advised to begin screening for colorectal cancer at age 50, but a new study suggests lowering the age to 45. The authors of the study, published in the journal Cancer, found that while, overall, rates for colorectal cancer are dropping, the same can’t be said for people under 50. In fact, they found that more than 12 percent of all the new diagnoses are occurring in this age group. And among these cases, the authors found there was greater lymph node involvement, meaning the cancers are “more aggressive, more difficult to treat, more deadly,” ABC News Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton notes. Watch the video below to learn more about this study: Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

New Jersey pizzeria is using its boxes to help find missing pets

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Angelo’s Pizza(NEW YORK) — Forget tacking a “Lost Pet” flyer on your neighborhood lamppost. A New Jersey pizzeria has re-imagined how to help reunite lost animals with their owners. John Sanfratello, owner of Angelo’s Pizza in Matawan, New Jersey, came up with the idea to attach missing animal flyers to the top of their pizza delivery boxes to help make a difference in the community. “Growing up, we used to have missing children on milk cartons,” Sanfratello told ABC News’ Good Morning America. “Why can’t the pizza box be the milk carton of today, but for animals?” The idea was inspired by a flyer Sanfratello saw for a lost cat. He thought the cat, named Hazel, resembled his family’s 12-year-old feline, Max, who once went missing for nearly a week. The similarities tugged on his heartstrings, prompting Sanfratello to post a call out on Angelo’s Pizza’s Facebook on July 11 to all pet owners, offering help to try to find their missing pets. The post was shared more than 1,500 times, prompting hundreds of comments. “We don’t care if owners

Watchdog: Border protection stored enough fentanyl to kill 794 million, but isn’t doing enough to protect its agents

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iStock(NEW YORK) — U.S. Customs and Border Protection has stored enough fentanyl in the past year to kill an estimated 794 million people, and now a government watchdog office is warning that the agency is “unnecessarily jeopardizing the lives” of its own agents by not sufficiently protecting them from accidental exposure to the lethal synthetic opioid. In a report released Friday, the Homeland Security Department’s Inspector General said the amount of fentanyl seized by agents and stored in vaults has skyrocketed — from 70 pounds in 2015 to 3,500 pounds so far in this budget year. A single 2 milligram dose of fentanyl (there are 453,592 milligrams in a pound) is lethal for most people, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration. In some cases, the powerful drug can sit in a vault for years while the government prosecutes its case. But when officials inspected several of the 62 vaults around the country operated by CBP, they found cases in which agents handling the powerful narcotic didn’t have access to naloxone, the drug that reverses the effects of an overdose. In

EPA allows continued use of pesticide linked to developmental issues in children

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iStock(NEW YORK) — The Environmental Protection Agency is not banning a pesticide linked to developmental issues in children, the agency announced this week despite years of calls to pull it from use, saying further study of its effects is needed. Chlorpyrifos is a pesticide used mostly on fruit and other produce. California and some other states have moved to ban the chemical from agricultural use because of the health risks, but the federal government has denied longstanding petitions from environmental groups. This is despite a finding from the EPA under the Obama administration that the pesticide should be completely banned, and a previous court order telling the agency to act on it. Environmental health experts say there’s evidence that exposure to even low levels of chlorpyrifos through conventional produce can lead to developmental and cognitive problems in infants and children and that they haven’t found a safe level for children or pregnant women. Catherine Karr, a pediatric environmental medicine specialist at the University of Washington, said doctors are concerned about what happens when the vulnerable, developing brain is exposed to

Mosquito milestone: use bacteria and radiation to eliminate the bugs

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iStockBY: Dr. Laith AlexanderIs repellent just not doing the trick to rid you of mosquitoes this summer? What about a different approach, like infecting the critters with bacteria topped up with a dose of radiation? It’s a serious idea. Researchers from Sun Yat-Sen University in China and Michigan State University have used the technique to all but eradicate the world’s most invasive mosquito — the Asian tiger mosquito — from two Chinese islands, and they have published their findings in the journal Nature. The Asian tiger mosquito, or the aedes albopictus, causes more than just an itchy bite. It can spread deadly viruses such as dengue fever and Zika. Controlling numbers of the winged bloodsuckers is key. “Mosquitoes are being transported around the globe and establishing themselves in places they have never been seen before,” said Stephen Dobson, professor of medical entomology at the University of Kentucky. “There is a great need to control mosquito numbers, both in China, and globally. And pathogens such as Zika virus are being seen in the United States.” The researchers’ first line of attack

Broken heart syndrome found more commonly in people with cancer, study shows

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ktsimage/iStock(NEW YORK) — One in six people with broken heart syndrome had cancer, according to an international study across nine countries, including the U.S. The findings were published this week in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Broken heart syndrome, otherwise known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy or Takotsubo syndrome, is a real phenomenon. Emotional or physical stress causes the heart to stop pumping well. Stress could be from anything: money problems, unemployment, divorce, a bad breakup, anger, a bad infection or a recent surgery. This temporary condition causes the main heart chamber to balloon, so blood does not flow well. Chest tightness or pain and shortness of breath make people with broken heart syndrome feel like they could be having a heart attack. The reason broken heart syndrome has this effect on the heart is unknown, and in the past, doctors have written about patients with broken heart syndrome and cancer. But no one has ever looked more closely at the relationship — until now. The study looked at 1,604 people with broken heart syndrome, 267 of whom had cancer.

Florida to require mental health courses in public schools beginning in sixth grade

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recep-bg/iStock(TALLAHASSEE, Fla.) – Florida public schools will now be required to offer at least five hours of mental health instruction to all students in sixth through 12th grades every year. The state Board of Education unanimously voted on Wednesday to approve the new requirements, which are part of a mental health initiative spearheaded by Florida first lady Casey DeSantis, the wife of Gov. Ron DeSantis. “Ron and I have traveled the state and have heard from many families who voice concern about the struggles that adversely affect so many of our children,” the first lady said in a statement. “We know that 50 percent of all mental illness cases begin by age 14, so we are being proactive in our commitment to provide our kids with the necessary tools to see them through their successes and challenges. Providing mental health instruction is another important step forward in supporting our families.” Under the new mandate, public school students in grades six through 12 must take courses every year related to youth mental health awareness and assistance to grades sixth through 12th.

How to keep your pets safe and cool in a heat wave

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Chalabala/iStock(NEW YORK) — With an extreme heat wave set to bake the U.S. from New York City all the way to Kansas City for the next few days, here are some ways to keep your four-legged and furry family members safe and cool as the temperatures outside soar. The American Society for the Prevention of Animal Cruelty released guidelines for how to keep your pets safe from overheating. How to keep pets safe from overheating – Know the symptoms of overheating in pets. This can include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse, according to the ASPCA. Other symptoms include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit or a body temperature of over 104 degrees. – As temperatures rise, keep your dogs away from hot asphalt. Sensitive paw pads can burn on hot asphalt, and an animal’s body that is very low to the ground can heat up quickly, so keep walks to a minimum. – Don’t over-exercise your animals during a heat wave. – Trim longer hair on your dog, but