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Health

Teenage athlete suddenly dies of mono after playing in a hockey game

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Adam_Lazar/iStock(CHICAGO) — A teenage hockey player died suddenly after playing in a game from complications with mononucleosis – an infection he was not even aware that he had. Gabe Remy’s teammates on the Chicago Fury said that they could see signs he wasn’t feeling well last week but just figured that it was symptoms of the flu or perhaps something similar. “[He was] hunched over a lot. Feeling really tired, said his stomach was bugging him,” teammate Joseph D’Alessandro told ABC News’ Chicago station WLS-TV. “You could tell he was in a lot of pain. He said there was pain in his shoulder blade, he was throwing up out in the locker room.” Remy insisted, however, that he would persevere through the pain and sickness even if he wasn’t feeling well. “He was excited to play. We love our guys to be aggressive and to go out there and compete hard, and he never had a problem competing,” said Al Dorich, head coach of the Chicago Fury. According to D’Allesandro, Remy played well in his last game. “If it was

Navy researchers working on PFAS-free firefighting foams that don't pose a health risk

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(U.S. Navy) PFAS-free firefighting foam was tested in late October at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington D.C.(WASHINGTON) — Testing is still at a small scale, but U.S. Navy researchers are encouraged by their work to develop new firefighting foams that do not contain the “forever chemicals” known as PFAS, that at high levels have been linked to increased health risks, including cancer. PFAS, which stands for per- and polyfluoroalkyl, is known as a “forever chemical” because it never degrades and will remain in the soil permanently. While found in a variety of household products and non-stick surfaces, PFAS compounds are found in large concentrations in the firefighting foams first developed by the U.S. military more than 50 years ago to put out jet-fuel fires at military bases and aboard warships. Over time, the PFAS in the foam enters the groundwater surrounding some military bases, which affects drinking water. The Pentagon has made tackling the risks of PFAS contamination at military bases and surrounding communities a top priority. Part of that effort includes developing a firefighting foam that is PFAS-free

Proposed Trump administration policy pushes for transparency in health care costs

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Official White House Photo by Tia Dufour(WASHINGTON) — The Trump administration announced a plan Friday that would require hospitals to disclose negotiated rates with insurance companies in an effort to increase transparency for consumers. Under the final rule, hospitals would also be required to publicly show the cost and description of a specific item or service online in an “easily-accessible” way. The policy put forth by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, “will require hospitals to provide patients with clear, accessible information about their ‘standard charges’ for the items and services they provide, including through the use of standardized data elements, making it easier to shop and compare across hospitals, as well as mitigating surprises,” HHS said in its announcement. The rule is set to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2021, according to HHS, so hospitals have time to comply with the new policies. And if hospitals fail to comply, they could ultimately face fines. “President Trump has promised American patients ‘A+’ healthcare transparency, but right now our system probably deserves an F on transparency,” Alex Azar, Health

Mom makes plea to lawmakers after daughter's death from Toxic Shock Syndrome

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Dawn Massabni(NEW YORK) — It was late March in 2017 when Madalyn Massabni flew home from college to spend her 19th birthday with her mother. Dawn Massabni, a mom of two from Rumson, New Jersey, said she was looking forward to celebrating with Maddy, whose smile could light up a room. At the time, Maddy was studying fashion at Lynn University in Florida and had dreams of working backstage at runway shows. “She dressed how she wanted and didn’t fear judgement. She did a little modeling and she loved it,” Massabni told ABC News’ Good Morning America. “She was on the cover of a magazine. And her favorite thing to do was be at the beach — even in the winter, she’d bundle up. “She had this contagious laugh, so when she walked in, people would say, ‘Oh, Maddy is here,'” Massabni said. ‘I miss hearing, “I love you, Mommy”‘ On March 27, Maddy’s birthday, she and her mother went out to dinner. Massabni said Maddy wasn’t feeling well when the two got home. Maddy got sick, but rested in

Apple charges ahead into medical research; introduces Research app

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Apple(NEW YORK) — We all want to live healthy lifestyles, and many of us follow along with the latest medical research. Getting large amounts of people to join research studies, however, can be a different story. “Clinical trials testing new medications are usually not difficult to enroll and people are generally willing to travel to the researcher’s office multiple times in order to participate,” Dr. David Bernstein, vice chair of medicine for clinical trials at Northwell Health in Manhasset, N.Y., told ABC News. The types of long-term trials meant to look at large amounts of people, though, “offer no perceived immediate benefit to the participant (and) are more difficult to enroll and potential subjects are less likely make frequent visits to a researcher’s office,” he added. But what if joining a research study were as easy as downloading an app on your phone? That’s what Apple is doing Thursday with the launch of the Research app, a free application for iPhone and Apple Watch through which users can enroll in large-scale research studies addressing a variety of health topics including

School comes together to support 'Super Nicholas' as he awaits new kidney

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Nicholas Corapi and his supporters at Hopedale Memorial. (Joe Corapi)(UXBRIDGE, Mass.) — Nicholas Corapi needs a new kidney, and his school is rallying around him while he waits for the perfect match. The 10-year-old’s mom, Kim Corapi, told Good Morning America that when he was born he was in kidney failure, something his parents found out while Nicholas was in still in utero. One of his kidneys was removed, but the other, which was operating at about 20 percent, his mom said, served him well enough — until recently. He’s been monitored closely throughout the years, getting his blood checked regularly, but in July, his mom said, he just didn’t seem himself. “He was very tired and sleeping all the time,” the Uxbridge, Mass., mom said. It turned out his kidney had totally shut down. Now Nicholas is on dialysis three days each week while waiting for a match. He wakes up at 4:30 a.m. on dialysis days to drive to Boston for his appointments. One of the things that makes Nicholas’ case unique, his mom said, is that he

This mom gave birth wearing a virtual reality headset and says it eased the pain of labor

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(NEW HAMPTON, N.Y.) — The pain of labor is something all moms experience and most moms never forget. Now hospital labor and delivery rooms are trying to help moms face the pain by turning to a technology used primarily by gamers: virtual reality headsets. Erin Martucci, a mom of three in New Hampton, N.Y., wore virtual reality headsets while giving birth to her two youngest children. The 43-year-old had such a quick labor with her first child, a now 4-year-old son named Michael Jr., that she wanted to go drug-free giving birth to her second child, just over one year later. Martucci said she barely knew about virtual reality, much less the fact that the technology was being used for labor. As her labor progressed, and the pain grew more intense, Martucci’s obstetrician offered the option of trying a VR headset. “[The doctor] came in with the equipment and put it on my head and the scene was a beach and there was also a voice guidance,” Martucci said. “The voice guidance and the visual calmed me down and made

As climate change worsens world health conditions, more nations need to act: Scientists

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mseidelch/iStock(NEW YORK) — Despite the pressing health concerns associated with climate change, only about half of 101 countries surveyed by the World Health Organization had national plans in place to address those problems, and fewer than 20% of those plans have been put into action. In the face of that inaction, climate change continues to wreak havoc on world health, according to a report published Wednesday in The Lancet. Not only was 2018 the fourth-hottest year on record, it was a year of prime weather conditions for disease transmission. As temperatures continue to increase, so do accompanying health problems, including the risk for infectious diseases and exposure to wildfires. 2018 saw the ideal conditions for the transmission of dengue, a mosquito-transmitted disease, as well as conditions suitable for diarrhoeal disease, a major killer of young children in areas that lack clean drinking water and sufficient sanitation. At the same time, 152 countries saw a noticeable increase in their population’s exposure to wildfires, and 220 million additional older adults were exposed to heatwaves, compared to baseline levels. Despite increasing public and

CDC: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria and fungi cause nearly three million infections each year

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Photo Credit: James Gathany, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(NEW YORK) — More people in the United States are dying from antibiotic-resistant infections than previously believed, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a report out on Wednesday. The latest data in the AR Threats Report showed that antibiotic-resistant fungi and bacteria cause more than 2.8 million infections each year. It also found that there are 35,000 antibiotic-resistant infection deaths each year. The CDC pointed to “data sources not previously available” for the updated information. The altered figures show nearly twice as many annual deaths from antibiotic-resistant infections than the agency reported in 2013. Since that time, the CDC says, prevention efforts have reduced deaths by 18 percent. But, according to a press release, “without continued vigilance…this progress may be challenged by the increasing burden of some infections.” Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Rescue puppy named Narwhal has a tail on his forehead and is 'perfectly healthy'

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(Credit: Rochelle Steffen/Macs Mission) Narwhal, a 10-week-old rescue puppy with an extra tail on his forehead, was found in rural Missouri by Mac’s Mission.(JACKSON, Mo.) — Meet Narwhal, a perfectly healthy rescue puppy with a surprising physical feature that makes him extra special. The 10-week-old furball who was rescued by Mac’s Mission — a nonprofit dog rescue that predominately helps pups with special needs — has a small tail-like growth on his forehead. Founder Rochelle Steffen told ABC News that they found the adorable light brown dog at a dump site in rural Jackson, Missouri, where she said “hundreds” [of dogs] have been dumped. “He had x-rays and a vet visit yesterday and is a perfectly healthy puppy, with an extra tail on his face,” she explained. “There is no medical need to remove it currently and it is a third the size of his actual tail.” The adorable light brown boy with a black nose and big brown eyes is thought to be a Daschund and Beagle mix, Steffen said. “He is in no pain and plays for hours,”