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Health

Warm weather and heat-related illness: Why it's important to stay hydrated

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kuppa_rock/iStock(NEW YORK) — As the weather warms up, more people are heading outside for both fun and exercise. But with warm weather comes a greater risk of heat-related illnesses, which is why it’s important to stay hydrated, especially if you’re practicing high-intensity activities, such as running. Heat-related illness is more likely to affect people who are 65 years old and above, however, other age groups can also be affected. From 2001 to 2010, there were 28,000 heat-related hospitalizations in the United States, with the highest rates occurring in the Southeast and Midwest, according to the latest figures from the Environmental Protection Agency. From 1979 to 2014, over 9,000 people died from heat-related causes. During that same time period, however, sports-related heat strokes more than doubled, with more deaths reported between 2005 and 2009 than any other five-year period in the preceding 30 years, according to a 2014 study. The good news is these complications are preventable if you take the right precautions. Here’s what you should know about heat-related illnesses and staying hydrated.Why is hydration important? Water is a fluid

Morgan Miller reflects on the drowning death of her daughter

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Stephen J. Cohen/WireImage(NEW YORK) — Almost a year after Olympic skier Bode Miller and his volleyball star wife lost their 19-month-old daughter in an accidental drowning in a neighbor’s swimming pool, Morgan Miller is working to raise awareness about water safety. In an Instagram post, Morgan Miller shared a PSA she made with another mother who lost a child to drowning. In it, they share details of what happened to their families and educate others on how to avoid the same fate. Both mothers encouraged parents to make a water safety plan. “Time is not on our side when it comes to water. And even though my daughter was resuscitated there was too much damage to her brain for her to survive,” Morgan Miller said. “It takes seconds.” Emmy Miller was 19 months old when she died following a drowning accident in Orange County, Calif last June. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, drowning is responsible for more deaths among children ages 1-4 than any other cause except for birth defects, and children ages 1-4 have the

As Memorial Day approaches, 62,000 pounds of raw beef products recalled due to E. coli concerns

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gilaxia/iStock(NEW YORK) — Over 62,000 pounds of raw beef products shipped nationwide are being recalled due to possible E. coli contamination, just days before Memorial Day, one of the country’s biggest grilling holidays. The beef products came from Aurora Packing Company in Aurora, Illinois, where they were packed on April 19, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). The products that are being recalled — cuts of meat that include skirt, brisket, short ribs and ribeye — are labeled with an establishment number of “EST. 788.” The FSIS implored anyone with these beef products to throw them away or return them. The contaminated meat was discovered during random sample testing by the FSIS. Although there have been no confirmed reports of illness from eating the meat, the FSIS asked anyone who is concerned about an injury or illness to contact a health care provider. E. coli is a bacteria often transmitted through contaminated food or water. The bacteria can cause stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting, with these symptoms normally appearing three to four days

14 nurses in 1 hospital oncology unit are pregnant at the same time

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Fourteen pregnant nurses from the oncology unit of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston are pictured in an undated handout photo. (Courtesy Massachusetts General Hospital)(BOSTON) — Over the past few months, 14 nurses have come into the office of Ellen Fitzgerald, director of nursing in an oncology unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. Each nurse has told Fitzgerald the same thing: “I am pregnant.” The 14 nurses in the unit, which treats leukemia and bone marrow patients, are all expecting between now and November. That is on top of four nurses in the unit who have already given birth this year. While the prospect of planning for 18 maternity leaves at once may sound overwhelming, Fitzgerald said the seriousness of the illnesses they treat in their oncology unit puts it all in perspective. “I don’t know that you can be anything but joyful about bringing life into the world,” Fitzgerald said. “We will take care of our patients and our nurses.” Fitzgerald said she created a spreadsheet to track the nurses’ schedules and that she plans to turn a room in the

Seven dietary factors may increase your risk of cancer: Study

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fcafotodigital/iStock(NEW YORK) — Seven dietary factors may increase the risk of cancer for American adults aged 20 and over, according to a new study published in the JNCI Cancer Spectrum medical journal. The study, conducted by researchers at Tuft’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, found that in 2015 over 80,000 new cancer cases were associated with low whole-grain intake, low dairy intake, high intake of processed meats and red meat, low fruit and vegetable intake, and high intake of sugary beverages. Those new cases represent approximately 5.2 percent of total cancer cases reported among U.S. adults in that year, similar to the percentage of cancer cases linked to alcohol consumption — approximately 4 percent to 6 percent — according to the researchers. “Our findings underscore the opportunity to reduce cancer burden and disparities in the United States by improving food intake,” the study’s lead author, Dr. Fang Fang Zhang, said in a statement. While the study looked at national data for diet and cancer, that data is based on what people self-reported. “It was a very interesting study,”

Girl with spina bifida chases her dreams by running in her first track race

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Courtesy Chelsea Garcia(NEW YORK) — Aubrey Garcia, a 7-year-old girl with spina bifida, is running straight into people’s hearts after completing her first track race. Aubrey’s mom Chelsea Garcia learned that her daughter had a fluid sac on her spine and an enlarged ventricle in her brain when she received her 20-week ultrasound. When the doctor called the next day to tell her and her husband what they had found, the couple didn’t know how to take the news. “I had never met anyone with the condition or read anything about it,” Garcia said. “You never think you’re going to hear something bad about your child.” The day after Aubrey was born she received surgery to remove her spinal defect and insert a shunt to drain the extra spinal fluid into her abdomen. Despite the procedure, the effects of her condition still impact her. Aubrey has no feeling from the knees down and has worn orthotics on her feet and ankles since she was 3 months old. When learning to walk, she had to teach herself using only her hip

Should parents get their kids' permission before posting their photos on social media?

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — You might think kids are sharing too much on social media, but in many cases it’s parents who are doing it — with kids complaining that their moms and dads are revealing way too much. For 14-year-old Lillian Durben of Silverlake, Washington, her mom Kate Durben was posting photos of her without permission. “To be honest, I was very upset,” Lillian told ABC News’ Good Morning America in a sit-down interview. Mom Kate said that although she knew her daughter didn’t want her to share certain pictures, she just couldn’t resist. “I justified it by saying, ‘It’s fine, it’s a cute picture. Why wouldn’t she want me to share it?,'” Kate told GMA. “She looked cute … but that isn’t the issue, is it?” “It really wasn’t the picture I was upset about,” Lillian explained. “Mostly it was just because I asked her not to post my photo. I just was hurt after I clearly didn’t want her to.” Kate has since pulled down the photos that Lillian had asked her not to share. Even celebrity

More questions than answers in death of 13-year-old Massachusetts girl left at hospital

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Adam Calaitzis/iStock(LAWRENCE, Mass.) — More questions than answers remain in the mysterious death of a 13-year-old girl as investigators look into how she died at a Lawrence, Mass., emergency room this week. Authorities have not released the name of the Amesbury, Mass., girl, but the family identified her as Chloe Ricard, reported ABC Boston affiliate WCVB. The 13-year-old was brought to the Lawrence General Hospital emergency room at 4:47 p.m. Monday and was pronounced dead “shortly after arrival,” the Essex District Attorney’s Office said in a statement. An autopsy was conducted Tuesday, but it’s expected to “take some time before there is a ruling on the cause and manner of death,” according to the district attorney’s office. Foul play has not been ruled out, district attorney’s office spokeswoman Carrie Kimball told ABC News Wednesday. Investigators are not disclosing how the teen arrived at the emergency room, citing the ongoing investigation, Kimball said. She added, “The people who brought her made her identity known to the hospital.” Ricard’s family said the teen had stayed with a friend on Sunday night. “Who

Democrats and Republicans come together to end surprise medical bills

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DNY59/iStock(WASHINGTON) — Katie Porter while fighting through the pain of a burst appendix during campaigning and just weeks before election day in Irvine, Ca., texted her campaign manager that she needed to go to the hospital. Even though there was an emergency room close by she asked to go to Hoag Hospital because she knew her health insurance would cover her since it was an in-network provider. Six hours later she awoke from surgery to see the medical team around her in a panic. They couldn’t get her temperature to drop or her blood pressure to rise and she would spend the next five days in the hospital recovering. Roughly $55,000 worth of her hospital costs were covered by her Anthem Blue Cross insurance policy. However, a few days later, Porter said she received a roughly $3,000 bill from her surgeon. While the hospital she went to was in-network, the surgeon himself was not and her insurance company refused to pay. “Apparently, to Anthem Blue Cross, $3,000 was too high a price to charge for saving my life,” Porter said

Rare eastern black rhinoceros born at Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo

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(Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo) An eastern black rhinoceros named Kapuki gave birth to a calf at Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago, May 19, 2019.(CHICAGO) — Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo recently welcomed the birth of a critically endangered black rhinoceros after more than a year of waiting. A 13-year-old eastern black rhino named Kapuki went into labor Sunday, after 15 months of pregnancy, and gave birth to a healthy calf in her enclosure that evening. The zoo has not yet named the newborn or announced its sex. The calf began to stand on its own after just 53 minutes and has been seen nursing several times, which are “important milestones,” according to the zoo. Animal care and veterinary staff are giving Kapuki and her calf privacy while closely monitoring them from afar via video cameras. The pair will not be visible to the public until further notice. “The first 48 hours of a calf’s life are critical and we remain cautiously optimistic,” Lincoln Park Zoo said in a Facebook post on Monday. The eastern black rhino, also known as the East African

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